EFFECT OF SCAPE REMOVAL ON GARLIC BULB YIELD IN CENTRAL WASHINGTON

G.Q. Pelter, E.J. Sorensen, R.W. Van Denburgh, R.M. Hannan
Although Washington State ranks fourth in the United States garlic (Allium sativum) production, garlic is a relatively minor crop, grown on 168 hectares (414 acres) in 1997 (Hannan and Sorensen, 2002). In Central Washington, garlic is grown for seed as well as for fresh local or regional marketing. Much of the fresh production is of hardneck types which are marketed throughout the fall and winter months. Large bulbs with good storage potential are desired by growers. Several reports suggest that removal of scapes (false seed-stalks) during the growing season will enhance bulb size and total yield (Engel, 1991; Hannan and Voss, 1991; Rosen and Tong, 2001). One reference alluded to a loss of storage life when scapes are removed (Engel, 1991).
Pelter, G.Q., Sorensen, E.J., Van Denburgh, R.W. and Hannan, R.M. 2005. EFFECT OF SCAPE REMOVAL ON GARLIC BULB YIELD IN CENTRAL WASHINGTON. Acta Hort. (ISHS) 688:323-326
http://www.actahort.org/books/688/688_47.htm
English

Acta Horticulturae