SOIL MICROBIAL ACTIVITY AND ROOTING AS INFLUENCED BY BIOSTIMULANT APPLICATION UNDER REDUCED NUTRIENT INPUTS IN THE GROW-IN YEAR OF A USGA GOLF GREEN

T. Butler, A. Hunter
Natural undisturbed soils contain high micro-organism populations. However, in sand based rootzones, which are commonly used on newly constructed or renovated golf greens, this is not the situation. Consequently, many turfgrass managers are seeking methods and commercial products such as biostimulants, to stimulate microflora and microfauna populations in such rootzones. This research was designed to study the impact (if any) of applying two commercially available biostimulants (CPR and PHC) under reduced nutrient rates (1/3, 2/3 and 1 times the normal recommended fertiliser application rates) in the grow-in year of a golf green constructed to United States Golf Association specification on root mass, soil bacterial and fungal activity and turfgrass stress tolerance levels. The results indicated that the application of biostimulants improved plant stress tolerance levels, however, no differences in soil microbial activity were found. No arbuscular mycorrhizal activity was found suggesting that root colonization is lacking in newly-constructed sand based rootzones.
Butler, T. and Hunter, A. 2008. SOIL MICROBIAL ACTIVITY AND ROOTING AS INFLUENCED BY BIOSTIMULANT APPLICATION UNDER REDUCED NUTRIENT INPUTS IN THE GROW-IN YEAR OF A USGA GOLF GREEN . Acta Hort. (ISHS) 783:443-453
http://www.actahort.org/books/783/783_46.htm
arbuscular mycorrhiza, fungi, microbial inoculant, stress levels
English

Acta Horticulturae