MONITORING GRAPE PHYLLOXERA POPULATIONS USING SIMPLE NON-DESTRUCTIVE TRAPPING SYSTEMS

K.S. Powell, G.A. Korosi, A.M. Mackie
In Australia grapevine phylloxera is currently restricted to phylloxera infested zones (PIZs) located in NSW and Victoria. Despite the relative success of quarantine protocols and boundaries phylloxera remains a threat to an industry that is predominantly planted on susceptible ungrafted Vitis Vinifera. Recent phylloxera outbreaks in Victoria, outside existing PIZs, highlight that quarantine is not completely effective. Vigilance needs to be maintained and improved detection and monitoring systems are required to reducing the impact of this economically important pest on the viticulture industry. Monitoring the abundance of dispersive stages phylloxera during the viticulture season using non-destructive trapping techniques at new and existing detection sites provides important baseline data for growers with phylloxera-infested vineyards. Data collected can also be used to compare population dynamics of different phylloxera genetic strains, help minimise the relative risk of transfer of phylloxera to uninfested vines (both grafted and ungrafted) and assess the influence of a range of site-related factors on phylloxera dispersal. Phylloxera population studies were conducted at three field sites in commercial vineyards over a single vine-growing season in Northeast and Central Victoria. The aim of this study was to determine the relative risk of transfer of phylloxera during the season on susceptible rootstocks and to assess the potential for using emergence traps as an early detection and surveillance system.
Powell, K.S., Korosi, G.A. and Mackie, A.M. 2009. MONITORING GRAPE PHYLLOXERA POPULATIONS USING SIMPLE NON-DESTRUCTIVE TRAPPING SYSTEMS . Acta Hort. (ISHS) 816:29-34
http://www.actahort.org/books/816/816_4.htm
phylloxera, detection, monitoring, genotype, emergence
English