INCIDENCE OF PESTS AND SEEDBORNE FUNGI IN SEEDS STORED BY INDIGENOUS METHODS IN THE NADOWLI DISTRICT OF GHANA

E.N.K. Sowley, A. Baalabong
It is common knowledge that healthy seeds are required for the production of healthy crops and for that matter higher yield. However, most farmers in developing countries rely on their own seeds for crop production. The study therefore was aimed at identifying the indigenous methods or structures used in storing seeds and how these affect the incidence of pests and pathogens as well as germination. Majority (74%) of farmers used indigenous storage structures/methods because they considered them to be more effective. The major indigenous storage structures identified in the study included mud silo (boore), gourd (kuore), straw basket (pie), ‘Kanpile’ (made from thatch), earthenware pot (dugu) and barn (bugo). Aspergillus niger, A. flavus, A. ochraceus, Penicillium spp., Fusarium spp. and Rhizopus stolonifer were the fungal pathogens isolated from seed samples collected from farmers. A. flavus was the most frequently isolated species detected by both agar plate and blotter methods while A. ochraceus was the least. Majority of the respondents (93%) used wood ash and botanicals such as neem in controlling pests and diseases. Infection lowered the germination of seeds. Storage method also influenced germination. It was realized from the study that farmers needed training on recommended seed storage practices. Some of the indigenous methods could be improved upon to prolong the life of seeds stored in them.
Sowley, E.N.K. and Baalabong, A. (2013). INCIDENCE OF PESTS AND SEEDBORNE FUNGI IN SEEDS STORED BY INDIGENOUS METHODS IN THE NADOWLI DISTRICT OF GHANA. Acta Hortic. 1007, 355-362
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2013.1007.39
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2013.1007.39
agar plate, barn, blotter, earthenware pot, germination, gourd, mud silo
English

Acta Horticulturae