SPACE AND TIME DYNAMICS OF THE EVOLUTION OF HORTICULTURE IN GABON: THE CASE OF MARKET-GARDENING CROPS IN LIBREVILLE

T. Nondah
With a significant but little exploited potential for development since national independence, the Gabonese horticultural sector is currently undergoing profound change. The experimental farms of the 1960s in the outskirts of the capital city Libreville, along with various productive structures added during the 1990s until the present, including production projects conceived during the 1970s incorporating irrigated plots, have been noted. Farming methods have gradually been forced to adapt to various constraints related to production. The size and number of farms vary now according to demand from urban markets. Libreville and its environs barely numbered 10 market-gardening farms until 1990, compared with nearly 1000 today. Aubergines, okra, basil, pepper and lettuce were the only fresh produce available in the past, whereas today the stalls of the markets and supermarkets are well stocked in various local products. Initially located only in remote urban outskirts, today these farms are much closer to the urban centre. This situation is a direct consequence of the evolution of food habits resulting from a rapid increase in population in the urban areas, and has contributed heavily to the alteration of the entire horticultural context. Production, marketing and services are now intertwined in the entire urban economy. This paper thus focuses on an analysis of the evolution of horticultural practices in a country known especially for the relative wealth of its basic products and the exploitation of its raw materials.
Nondah, T. (2014). SPACE AND TIME DYNAMICS OF THE EVOLUTION OF HORTICULTURE IN GABON: THE CASE OF MARKET-GARDENING CROPS IN LIBREVILLE . Acta Hortic. 1021, 383-387
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2014.1021.35
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2014.1021.35
horticulture, development, urban and peri-urban areas, vegetables
English

Acta Horticulturae