BIOTECHNOLOGY IN THE FRUIT INDUSTRY: GREAT SCIENCE, BUT WHAT ABOUT OUR 'CLEAN GREEN' IMAGE?

J.G. Knight, A. Clark
Frequently heard within New Zealand are arguments that release of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) into the environment will harm the ‘clean green’ image of the country, and therefore do irreparable harm to our export markets for food products, and also to our tourism industry. But where is the evidence? The likelihood of harmful effects on New Zealand’s clean green image has been investigated using: face-to-face interviews with gatekeepers in the food distribution channel in five countries in Europe, in China, and in India; choice modelling studies involving 4,536 consumers making actual choices (not just giving opinions) in real shopping situations in five countries in Europe and in New Zealand. Results are presented of surveys of 515 first-time visitors to New Zealand, intercepted at Auckland International Airport soon after arrival. It is concluded that it is highly unlikely that introduction of GM plants into New Zealand would have any long-term deleterious effect on perceptions in overseas markets, particularly in Europe, of food products sourced from New Zealand. Furthermore, it is highly unlikely that New Zealand’s image as a tourist destination would suffer if GM plants were introduced.
Knight, J.G. and Clark, A. (2014). BIOTECHNOLOGY IN THE FRUIT INDUSTRY: GREAT SCIENCE, BUT WHAT ABOUT OUR 'CLEAN GREEN' IMAGE?. Acta Hortic. 1048, 207-214
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2014.1048.25
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2014.1048.25
genetic modification, controversial technology, country image, tourism
English

Acta Horticulturae