CAN A CHANGE IN VINEYARD PRACTICE MITIGATE WARMING DUE TO CLIMATE CHANGE?

M.C.T. Trought, A.K. Parker, C. van Leeuwen
Predicted warming resulting from climate change is expected to advance the phenology of grapevines. As a consequence, where traditional vineyard methods are used, fruit will ripen earlier in the growing season and potentially under warmer conditions. This in turn may alter the flavour and aroma profiles of wines grown in many of the traditional winegrowing regions of the world. Modified vineyard management practices may be used to negate the effects of changes in development time from warming as indicated from techniques that delay the onset of véraison (e.g., delaying pruning time, reducing the leaf area to fruit weight ratio, and/or using plant growth regulators after fruit set). These practices may counteract a small (+0.5°C) increase in average daily temperature enabling current grape cultivars to continue to be grown in traditional regions. However, these modified practices may be insufficient to reverse the advance in phenology resulting from a temperature rise of 2.0C.
Trought, M.C.T., Parker, A.K. and van Leeuwen, C. (2015). CAN A CHANGE IN VINEYARD PRACTICE MITIGATE WARMING DUE TO CLIMATE CHANGE?. Acta Hortic. 1082, 397-402
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2015.1082.55
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2015.1082.55
grapevine flowering véraison (GFV) model, phenology, ripening, climate change
English

Acta Horticulturae