THE INFLUENCE OF STRIGOLACTONE PATHWAY GENES ON PLANT ARCHITECTURE: A STUDY ON THE INHERITANCE OF HORTICULTURAL TRAITS IN CHRYSANTHEMUM

M. Klie, M. Linde, T. Debener
Chrysanthemums (Chrysanthemum indicum hybrid) are one of the most important ornamental plants with a large variation for different phenotypic traits; however, there is only limited data about the inheritance of these traits or corresponding marker-trait associations. We phenotyped and genotyped two types of chrysanthemum populations with the main focus on shoot branching: a collection of 86 cultivars and a biparental F1-population of 160 individuals. We identified 15 marker-trait associations with AFLP markers for the genotype collection using a genome-wide association study and 17 marker-trait associations for the population by applying a single locus analysis. Additionally, we started a candidate gene approach for strigolactone pathway genes to identify marker alleles that are significantly associated with shoot branching. First results indicate, that these genes describe a large proportion of the variation in shoot branching in these populations. This highlights the role of the strigolactone pathway and indicates that shoot branching in the chrysanthemum has a polygenic inheritance pattern, though other yet unknown factors are also likely involved. Although nearly all of the investigated traits were characterized by a continuous variation in phenotypic values, as was expected for the outcrossing hexasomic nature of the chrysanthemum, we identified informative marker-trait associations with important characteristics.
Klie, M., Linde, M. and Debener, T. (2015). THE INFLUENCE OF STRIGOLACTONE PATHWAY GENES ON PLANT ARCHITECTURE: A STUDY ON THE INHERITANCE OF HORTICULTURAL TRAITS IN CHRYSANTHEMUM. Acta Hortic. 1087, 171-178
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2015.1087.20
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2015.1087.20
genome wide association study, MAX pathway, QTL, shoot branching
English

Acta Horticulturae