FROM LOW TECHNOLOGY TO BIOTECHNOLOGY: PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS TO INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES' POSTHARVEST NEEDS

C. Somasundram, A. Sagran, Z. Razali, R.O.P. San
Postharvest practices are vital to ensure optimum preservation of crop quality after harvest until it reaches consumers. They can range from simple, low technology to complex advanced methods; both techniques seek to maximise farming outputs for high returns. The indigenous communities in Malaysia are heavily reliant on self-sustenance through cultural farming practices and thus the incorporation of good postharvest practices would be beneficial to their livelihood. Amongst the many agricultural choices, bananas are a major food crop that is planted by most indigenous communities. Unfortunately, the handling and processing of bananas by the indigenous communities do not meet basic requirement for shelf life extension thus resulting in high losses. At present, various technologies have been developed to help extend shelf life of bananas which are often employed by commercial banana farms or mainstream planters. After comprehensive reviews, investigations and surveys, some of these technologies were found to be viable but not affordable or practical for the use of indigenous communities. This paper presents data for some low technologies developed for these communities which are innovations adapted from current working postharvest practices.
Somasundram, C., Sagran, A., Razali, Z. and San, R.O.P. (2015). FROM LOW TECHNOLOGY TO BIOTECHNOLOGY: PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS TO INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES' POSTHARVEST NEEDS. Acta Hortic. 1088, 273-276
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2015.1088.44
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2015.1088.44
banana, shelf-life, quality, indigenous community
English

Acta Horticulturae