Effects of chemical compounds and hot water on quality of fresh-cut white cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata)

S. Valencia-Chamorro, C. Tapia-Peñafiel, M.C. Sotomayor-Grijalva
The effects of the addition of chemical compounds classified as LSQUOgenerally recognized as safeRSQUO (GRAS), and hot water, on fresh-cut cabbage were studied. Strips were prepared from cabbages and treated with solutions of acetic acid (AT) (0.15%, w/w), ascorbic acid (AA) (0.2%, w/w) and citric acid (0.5%, w/w) in combination, potassium sorbate (SP) (0.2%, w/w), and water as a control (C). Treated samples were packed in polypropylene (PP) bags and stored at 4°C for 12 days. Physical, chemical, microbiological, and sensory analyses were performed. Samples treated with the ascorbic-citric acid combination exhibited lower browning index (BI), lower microbial contamination and better sensory attributes than the other samples. In another experiment, this chemical treatment was compared with samples immersed in hot water. Cabbage strips were treated with the ascorbic-citric acid combination, dipped in hot water (60°C, 2 min), and dipped in water at ambient temperature as a control; these were packed in PP and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) bags, and stored at 4°C for 12 days. Samples with the hot-water treatment showed a weight loss of less than 0.2%, and lower carbon dioxide accumulation inside the bags than other samples. In this treatment, total polyphenol content was reduced by around 15.5% compared with the initial sample (363 mg 100 g-1 as % gallic acid equivalents); however, ΔE was the highest. The ascorbic-citric acid combination treatment showed a weight loss of less than 0.5%. This treatment maintained the microbiological and sensory quality of samples during the storage time. Total polyphenol content was increased by 8.2%. Thus, the ascorbic-citric acid combination treatment may be an alternative for fresh-cut white cabbage.
Valencia-Chamorro, S., Tapia-Peñafiel, C. and Sotomayor-Grijalva, M.C. (2016). Effects of chemical compounds and hot water on quality of fresh-cut white cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata). Acta Hortic. 1141, 335-342
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2016.1141.42
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2016.1141.42
shredded cabbage, GRAS compounds, chemical treatments, physical treatments
English

Acta Horticulturae