Bacterial canker: strategies to limit losses in Michigan, USA

M.K. Hausbeck
Tomatoes are an industry worth $52.9 million to growers in Michigan, USA. Bacterial canker (causal bacterium, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis) is an economic problem worldwide, and can cause crop losses in Michigan as high as $300,000 USD per grower per year. In the Midwest of the United States, production fields are established with transplants grown in the greenhouse, a wet, humid environment that favors spread of bacteria. It is economical to treat transplants in the greenhouse, as plants are small and closely spaced, yet Michigan growers also desire effective field treatments. Experiments investigated the effect of bactericides applied to (1) inoculated transplants in the greenhouse and (2) inoculated transplants in the field. Greenhouse applications of streptomycin reduced bacterial populations compared with the untreated inoculated control and mancozeb in both years, and streptomycin + copper hydroxide yielded significantly more fruit than the untreated inoculated control in both years of the study. Field applications of copper hydroxide and acibenzolar-S-methyl (ABM) alternated with copper hydroxide significantly reduced leaf blight, and the two prior treatments plus famoxadone/cymoxanil alternated with copper hydroxide significantly increased plant vigor compared with the untreated inoculated control. Bacterial canker management recommendations include alternating applications of streptomycin and copper hydroxide in the greenhouse, and alternating applications of ABM, copper hydroxide and famoxadone/cymoxanil in the field.
Hausbeck, M.K. (2017). Bacterial canker: strategies to limit losses in Michigan, USA. Acta Hortic. 1159, 131-138
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2017.1159.20
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2017.1159.20
Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, bactericides
English

Acta Horticulturae