AIR TEMPERATURE, SOIL WARMING AND PHOSPHORUS NUTRITION OF GREENHOUSE TOMATOES

R.A.J. White
Effects of soil warming with and without phosphorus liquid feeding on tomato yield and phosphorus uptake were studied with crops grown in border soil and peat modules at 5 and 13° minimum night temperatures (MNT). Total yields at 5° MNT with soil warming were not significantly different from total yields at 13° MNT without soil warming. The effects of low soil temperature at low MNT were expected to reduce phosphorus uptake and limit yield. Results showed phosphorus liquid feeding had little benefit on soil, and that soil temperatures had little effect on phosphorus nutrition. It is suggested that the low phosphorus uptake from soil at all temperatures might be due to 'root death' as the first fruit ripened. Phosphorus uptake was very much greater by plants grown in peat than in soil, and it is suggested that peat module growing techniques may be more suitable for low night temperature, energy conserving regimes than border soil growing because of the ease of avoiding potential phosphorus nutrition problems.
White, R.A.J. (1981). AIR TEMPERATURE, SOIL WARMING AND PHOSPHORUS NUTRITION OF GREENHOUSE TOMATOES. Acta Hortic. 115, 235-244
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1981.115.26
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1981.115.26

Acta Horticulturae