Volatiles and enzymes involved in off-flavor development in trimmed young coconut water during low temperature storage

K. Meethaworn, J. Siriphanich
Off-flavor was often detected in trimmed young coconuts stored at 2-4°C. To understand the cause of the off-flavor, a study was conducted to detect the changes in fruit volatiles and enzyme activities involved in lipid degradation process. Young intact and trimmed coconuts were stored at 4 and 25°C for 4 weeks and evaluated for the aroma and volatile compositions of coconut water using a GC-MS. At harvest the coconut water contained 11 aromatic compounds. Off-flavor was detected after storage at 4°C for 2 weeks and was found to relate to the increase of octanal. Lipoxygenase activity in coconut water was low and slightly decreased during storage. No differences were found in the activity between the two storage temperatures and between the intact and trimmed fruit. Lipase activity in the water increased moderately. There was a tendency that coconut water contained a higher lipase activity in trimmed fruit than the intact fruit and at 4°C than 25°C. It was suggested that off-flavor in young coconut was the result of lipid oxidation in the kernel and subsequently released octanal, the oxidative product, into the water during storage at 4°C.
Meethaworn, K. and Siriphanich, J. (2017). Volatiles and enzymes involved in off-flavor development in trimmed young coconut water during low temperature storage. Acta Hortic. 1178, 105-110
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2017.1178.19
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2017.1178.19
chilling injury, lipase, lipoxygenase, volatiles
English

Acta Horticulturae