Bio-aesthetic planning - assumptions about an imperialist garden cultural connection between Germany, England, and India

G. Groening
Bio-aesthetic planning has been popularized in India by Mohinder Singh Randhawa (1909-1988). Some of these ideas have become implemented at Chandigarh. Randhawa refers to the English writer Lancelot Hogben (1895-1975) and his idea of bio-aesthetic planning in early 20th century. Before Hogben, the Irish landscape architect and writer William Robinson (1838-1935) and the German landscape architect Willy Lange (1864-1941) had developed comparable ideas in late 19th and early 20th centuries. From 1893 onwards until his death in 1956 the German landscape architect Gustav Hermann Krumbiegel (1865-1956) has been active in a number of places in India. Along these lines some sketchy lines are drawn of an imperialist garden cultural connection between the German Empire, the English Empire and India.
Groening, G. (2017). Bio-aesthetic planning - assumptions about an imperialist garden cultural connection between Germany, England, and India. Acta Hortic. 1181, 1-16
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2017.1181.1
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2017.1181.1
Lancelot Hogben, Gustav Hermann Krumbiegel, Willy Lange, Mohinder Singh Randhawa, Baroda, Kew Garden, new social contract, physiognomy, plant associations, planned ecology
English