Evaluation of the establishment of native Mediterranean plant species suggested for landscape enhancement in archaeological sites of Greece

M. Papafotiou, K.F. Bertsouklis, A.N. Martini, G. Vlachou, A. Akoumianaki-Ioannidou, E. Kanellou, E.D. Kartsonas
The establishment capacity of Anthyllis barba-jovis, Anthyllis hermanniae, Asphodelus fistulosus, Atriplex halimus, Ballota acetabulosa, Calamintha nepeta, Calamintha cretica, Limoniastrum monopetalum, Scabiosa hymettia and Teucrium capitatum was evaluated for potential ornamental use in archaeological sites of Greece. Four-month old plants, produced by cuttings, were planted in three archaeological sites of Greece with different microclimate, Amphipolis (in Serres regional unit, N Greece), Kolona (in Aegina island, SE Greece) and Ancient Messene (in SW Peloponnese, SW Greece), in December 2013, as well as in March and December 2014. Plants were not irrigated. Every three months, the weeds around each plant were removed. In April 2015 one more planting was held in the Botanical Garden of the Laboratory of Floriculture and Landscape Architecture, Agricultural University of Athens (AUA), during which existing weeds were removed before planting, soil surface was covered with black geotextile for weed control, and plants were irrigated (per fifteen days) during summer period (June to September). Plant survival percentages of all plantings were recorded in September 2015. In Amfipolis, A. fistulosus, B. acetabulosa, C. nepeta, S. hymettia and T. capitatum survived at quite satisfactory rates (>70%), while A. halimus and L. monopetalum did not survive. In Kolona, A. fistulosus, A. halimus and L. monopetalum survived at the highest rates (up to 100%) and B. acetabulosa at 40-70%. In Ancient Messene, A. fistulosus, B. acetabulosa, C. cretica, L. monopetalum and S. hymettia survived at high percentages (≥70%). At AUA the survival rate of all species was very high (90-100%). Conclusively, A. fistulosus and B. acetabulosa showed the greatest adaptability throughout Greece, while L. monopetalum proved ideal for S. Greece. The use of geotextile for weed control and the application of sparse irrigation during the dry hot period contributed to a more efficient establishment of all species.
Papafotiou, M., Bertsouklis, K.F., Martini, A.N., Vlachou, G., Akoumianaki-Ioannidou, A., Kanellou, E. and Kartsonas, E.D. (2017). Evaluation of the establishment of native Mediterranean plant species suggested for landscape enhancement in archaeological sites of Greece. Acta Hortic. 1189, 177-180
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2017.1189.35
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2017.1189.35
sustainable weed management, arid horticulture, degraded areas restoration
English

Acta Horticulturae