Determining origins of populations of the Australian olive lace bug, Froggattia olivinia (Hemiptera: Tingidae), using cytochrome oxidase I as a mitochondrial molecular marker

R.N. Spooner-Hart, J.E. King
The olive lace bug, Froggattia olivinia Froggatt, is an Australian sap-sucking insect initially reported feeding on the underside of leaves of its native host, Notelaea longifolia Vent, in eastern Australia. While most tingids are typically host specific, F. olivinia has moved from its native host to cultivated olive, Olea europaea L., which poses a significant pest threat to the Australian olive industry. In both hosts, F. olivinia is responsible for chlorotic spotting and yellowing of leaves and, in extreme cases, leaf drop and twig and branch dieback. While both plant species belong to the family Oleaceae, movement from the indigenous to the introduced host is poorly understood. An outcome of the movement of olive plants and the expanding olive industry throughout Australia has led to the introduction and establishment of F. olivinia populations in Western Australia, South Australia, Victoria and Tasmania, and increased pest status in eastern Australia. Determining the original source of these introduced populations is important to prevent the further spread of F. olivinia as well as to assist in the management of this species, which is difficult to control. Our preliminary study, using cytochrome oxidase I (COI) sequences and involving bugs collected from 25 locations in eight regions, suggests that populations introduced to South Australia originated from the Sydney Basin and/or South Eastern Highlands (specifically Goulburn and Canberra), whereas Western Australian and isolated Victorian populations point towards a likely origin of south-east Queensland. Outliers from the Sydney Basin and South Eastern Highlands populations, however, confound the precise source. For future management of F. olivinia, further research is paramount in understanding how infestations in olive groves, particularly in its natural range in New South Wales and south-east Queensland, transfer between sites, as well as movement into groves from native host plants in adjoining vegetation.
Spooner-Hart, R.N. and King, J.E. (2018). Determining origins of populations of the Australian olive lace bug, Froggattia olivinia (Hemiptera: Tingidae), using cytochrome oxidase I as a mitochondrial molecular marker. Acta Hortic. 1199, 421-426
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2018.1199.67
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2018.1199.67
olive pests, invasive populations, plant hosts, population genetics, Wolbachia
English

Acta Horticulturae