New food supply chain systems based on a proximity model: the case of an alternative food network in the Catania urban area

G. Timpanaro, V.T. Foti, A. Scuderi, G. Schippa, F. Branca
With increasing urbanisation massive daily flows of agricultural products coming from rural areas to cities generate high amounts of heat, CO2, waste water and other waste. The negative balance on sustainability is also caused by the creation of long, winding, and often inefficient supply chains, that negatively impact society economically. In contrast to this trend, an increasingly critical mass consumer demand for traditional food has emerged, supported by shoppers who demonstrate a clear desire to purchase quality products, know the specific identity of the territory where these products are grown, and support the local economy and food system. This thus generates around urban areas growing models of consumption known in the literature as alternative food network (AFN). These networks are often linked with reciprocal ties that promote a sustainable and civil economy, environment, biodiversity and respect for tradition, all of which can take several forms. The creation of shorter supply chains for safe and high-quality food will reduce cities' ecological footprint by limiting energy in transport, contribute to food security and assist in the safeguarding of agro-biodiversity. This research focuses on Catania, Sicily as a pilot, and analyses the context of AFNs to define their current status and focuses on farmers' markets in the urban area, as a model of land development, traditional products and biodiversity of the area.
Timpanaro, G., Foti, V.T., Scuderi, A., Schippa, G. and Branca, F. (2018). New food supply chain systems based on a proximity model: the case of an alternative food network in the Catania urban area. Acta Hortic. 1215, 213-218
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2018.1215.39
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2018.1215.39
short supply chain, farmers' markets, network, stakeholders, horticulture
English

Acta Horticulturae