Peach rootstock differences in tree survival from bacterial canker in the southeastern United States

M.L. Parker, D.F. Ritchie, G.L. Reighard, B. Clark, R.M. West
A peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) rootstock trial coordinated by the NC-140 Cooperative Regional Rootstock Project was planted at the Sandhills Research Station in Jackson Springs, North Carolina, USA consisting of 17 rootstocks with ‘Redhaven’ as the scion cultivar. Soil was preplant treated in October 2008 with Telone II (1,3-dichloropropene). The trees were planted in March 2009 and grew well in 2009 with no tree loss. However, in the spring of 2010 there was a significant amount of terminal dieback and tree death on several of the selections resulting from bacterial canker (Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae van Hall). The severity of bacterial canker was rated and the trees with the greatest mortality were grown on Krymsk® 1, Bright’s Hybrid #5 and Prunus americana. In 2012, prior to bloom, significant trunk bark water-soaking frequently associated with bacterial canker was evident on many trees which was followed by tree collapse. Seven out of the eight trees on ControllerTM 5 and all of the trees on Imperial California collapsed with significant death for trees grown on Krymsk® 1. In 2016, in addition to the complete loss of all trees on Imperial California, excessive tree death also occurred with trees on ControllerTM 5, Penta, Fortuna, Krymsk® 1, Krymsk® 86 and Replantpac®. This study is helping to determine the sensitivity of rootstocks of mixed parentage and origin for bacterial canker sensitivity.
Parker, M.L., Ritchie, D.F., Reighard, G.L., Clark, B. and West, R.M. (2018). Peach rootstock differences in tree survival from bacterial canker in the southeastern United States. Acta Hortic. 1228, 259-264
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2018.1228.39
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2018.1228.39
Prunus persica, peach tree short life, cumulative yield, trunk cross-sectional area
English

Acta Horticulturae