El Jardín de la Alameda in Murcia, Spain: origin and transformations of a public tree-lined boulevard

F. Medina, J. Ochoa
The habit of strolling as a way to leave the dense housing grid that formed Spanish cities led to the emergence of certain places, distributed along the roads that entered the towns. Initially called “prados” (“meadows”), these spaces gradually developed into tree-lined avenues known as “alamedas”. The purpose is to study the origin and evolution of this garden, recently declared as the first historic garden in the city of Murcia, Spain. Originally, the tree species used were mainly poplar (Populus alba), black poplar (Populus nigra), and elm tree (Ulmus minor), distributed in linear alignments to facilitate the stroll. Initially called Jardín de la Alameda, it was renamed as Jardín de Floridablanca in the mid-nineteenth century. After several interventions and changes the council of Murcia has promoted its preservation becoming the first historic garden in this region in an urban context.
Medina, F. and Ochoa, J. (2020). El Jardín de la Alameda in Murcia, Spain: origin and transformations of a public tree-lined boulevard. Acta Hortic. 1279, 109-112
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2020.1279.16
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2020.1279.16
historic garden, Jardín de Floridablanca, Barrio del Carmen, Olmos
English

Acta Horticulturae