Influence of grafting and pruning on 'Anahu' and 'Rutgers' tomato plant biomass partitioning in the presence and absence of Meloidogyne incognita

B. Eshchanov, G. Bird
Understanding the impacts of horticultural practices and root-knot nematodes on biomass partitioning is important for selection of rootstocks and scions for grafted plants. The objective of this research was to determine the impact of homo- and hetero-grafting of Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) ‘Anahu’ and ‘Rutgers’ on biomass partitioning among stem/leaf, fruit, and root tissues in the presence and absence of Meloidogyne incognita (southern root-knot nematode), under three pruning regimes (none, light, and heavy). In the absence of southern root-knot nematode (SRKN), non-grafted and non-pruned ‘Anahu’ and ‘Rutgers’ had different biomass partitioning patterns. ‘Anahu’ allocated most of its fresh weight to stem and leaf tissues, while ‘Rutgers’ partitioned most of its biomass to fruit. Root tissue biomass partitioning was not significantly different between these cultivars. Homo- and hetero-grafting, light and heavy pruning, and SRKN impacted biomass partitioning, root gall formation and SRKN female development. Non-grafted, homo-grafted, and hetero-grafted plants partition leaf/stem and root dry weight biomass according to the global allometric biomass partitioning rules for seed plants.
Eshchanov, B. and Bird, G. (2021). Influence of grafting and pruning on 'Anahu' and 'Rutgers' tomato plant biomass partitioning in the presence and absence of Meloidogyne incognita. Acta Hortic. 1302, 185-192
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2021.1302.25
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2021.1302.25
grafting, pruning, biomass partitioning, tomato, 'Anahu', 'Rutgers', southern root-knot nematode
English

Acta Horticulturae