Gardening programs based on METs and HR values are needed to prevent dementia in elderly people requiring support

H. Kikukawa, M. Toyoda
The physical load associated with gardening activities can improve the motor function of healthy elderly people and prevent dementia. However, gardening has not been studied in elderly people requiring support or long-term care. In this study, we provided six types of gardening activities for elderly people requiring support - tilling, furrowing, planting, weeding, watering, and sowing. We used a triaxial acceleration sensor to measure and analyze the metabolic equivalent of task (MET) and heart rate (HR) values during these activities. To clarify the differences in activity load between younger and older people, we also surveyed high school students using the same method. The MET values were the highest for tilling and lowest for sowing in the elderly participants. Tiling, furrowing, planting, weeding, and watering imposed only a moderate physical burden and produced a minimal load. The METs we measured were low intensity. Sowing produced the lowest HR, while the other activities did not show a significant difference. Therefore, we found that gardening activities can be used with elderly people requiring support to help maintain their physical and mental health.
Kikukawa, H. and Toyoda, M. (2021). Gardening programs based on METs and HR values are needed to prevent dementia in elderly people requiring support. Acta Hortic. 1330, 147-152
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2021.1330.16
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2021.1330.16
blood pressure, dementia prevention, gardening activities, gardening work analysis
English

Acta Horticulturae