FIREBLIGHT IN PERRY PEARS AND CIDER APPLES IN THE SOUTH WEST OF ENGLAND

D.C. Gwynne
Fireblight was first recorded in the South West of England in 1971 but did not become widespread until 1978. The disease was well established and regarded as endemic in 1980. The main economic hosts are perry pear, in which the disease is usually fatal, and cider apples where, even though widespread, the infection travels slowly and is usually confined to the flower trusses or shoot tips. Crataegus ocyacantha is also a host and a major source of infection.

Trials were started in 1981 to establish whether the disease could be controlled by spray chemicals. Streptomycin was used as the standard and compared with various synthetic bactericides and copper compounds. A survey of blossoming time was also conducted in 1983 from which there are clear indications of the importance of blossoming time to infection conditions. These observations could be of vital importance in the development of any predictive scheme which in turn could be essential to the development of economic control measures. The economic importance of fireblight in fruit production in the South West of England is outlined and the results of trials to date are given.

Gwynne, D.C. (1984). FIREBLIGHT IN PERRY PEARS AND CIDER APPLES IN THE SOUTH WEST OF ENGLAND. Acta Hortic. 151, 41-48
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1984.151.4
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1984.151.4

Acta Horticulturae