NEW EDUCATIONAL ASPECTS FOR TRAINING METHODS IN HORTICULTURE

F. Stockey
Among other things, work theory is expected to provide practical and sensible methods of training. Worthwhile aims, which can indeed be reached by suitable educational practices, are shorter apprenticeships and the rapid promulgation of better working practices.
  1. The procedures of learning are based in the interrelation, determined by the working environment, of the learner, the teacher, and the given task. In the following, the suitability of the learner for the work, his wish to learn, and the optimum working environment are assumed. The process of learning is individual, even within a group. Everybody has his own way of learning, but he can be a specific type of learner (quick - normal - slow). The process of learning is furthered by external calm. The teacher is expected to be versed in his subject, and personally and educatinally suited to the task.

    The task detemines the nature, the volume and the degree of difficulty of what is being taught; this must be introduced to the learner in a comprehensible way. For this reason the questions of What? How? and Why? must bbe answered quite clearly when explaining the task, and must not disappear into immaterial details. Every instruction should be pragmatic.

  2. Learning while working is in itself a natural process, and therefore the introductory situation should be created artificially.
Stockey, F. (1970). NEW EDUCATIONAL ASPECTS FOR TRAINING METHODS IN HORTICULTURE. Acta Hortic. 19, 63-71
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1970.19.3
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1970.19.3
19_3
63-71