HORTICULTURAL AND THERAPEUTIC METHODS IN USE AT THE EAST AFRICAN PLANT QUARANTINE STATION

P.J. Dickinson
These are used for all planting material and seeds which have to be subjected to a period of quarantine. Each quarantine chamber consists of a glasshouse measuring 2.4 m x 3.05 m x 1.83 m mounted on a concrete wall 1.22 m high so that the height to the eaves is 3.05 metres. The glass is sealed on all edges and the door is fitted with a rubber seal. Ventilation is obtained by allowing air to enter through insect-proof vents which are constructed immediately above floor level, the air is withdrawn at the ridge, through a glasswool filter. The house is heated by tubular electric heaters controlled through a thermostat. Humidity can be maintained either by overhead spraying or by the use of a humidifier which releases steam into the compartment. Plants are watered either by an overhead spray controlled from outside or from interior taps, one of which can be used for trickle irrigation. Each glasshouse is surrounded by a trough of water containing disinfectant and all excess water from the chamber is fed underground to a soak-away pit treated with disinfectant. Vapona strips are used in all glasshouses at all times. Within each house there is a waterproof electric plug which can be used for additional equipment such as a humidifier, extra heater or light; all electrical controls are mounted in a box outside the house.

Four of the 20 chambers have moveable ducting fitted to the ventilators, this can be connected to a refrigeration unit to provide especially cool conditions for high altitude crops.

Dickinson, P.J. (1971). HORTICULTURAL AND THERAPEUTIC METHODS IN USE AT THE EAST AFRICAN PLANT QUARANTINE STATION. Acta Hortic. 21, 186-190
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1971.21.31
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1971.21.31

Acta Horticulturae