CULTURAL PRACTICES FOR MAXIMIZING YIELD AND QUALITY OF VEGETABLES FOR PROCESSING

Dale W. Kretchman
An optimum stand is essential for maximizing yields of vegetable crops. The use of pre-germinated or primed seed and soil anticrustants have improved stand establishment with seeded tomato crops. Time to emergence has been reduced by using pre-germinated seed. Seedlings from primed seed had increased early vigor which improved plant stands. Increased tomato plant density from the use of twin-row culture and growing on raised beds has resulted in increased yields and more uniform fruit ripening. However, cultivars respond differently to twin-row culture and to timing of applications of nitrogen fertilizer. Early, highly determinant cultivars had increased yields from an additional application of nitrogen fertilizer three to four weeks after transplanting. Mid-season cultivars responded best when the nitrogen was applied prior to planting. Cucumbers for processing which were picked multiple times also responded positively from an additional application of nitrogen when plants were just starting to vine. Potassium appeared critical for optimum fruit color development on the determinant, small-vined tomato cultivars. Yields of cabbage were increased from high plant density and high rates of nitrogen fertilizer, but head size, burst, head rot and tip-burn were adversely affected.
Kretchman, Dale W. (1988). CULTURAL PRACTICES FOR MAXIMIZING YIELD AND QUALITY OF VEGETABLES FOR PROCESSING. Acta Hortic. 220, 165-180
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1988.220.23
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1988.220.23

Acta Horticulturae