SOME EFFECTS OF ROOT TEMPERATURE ON THE GROWTH AND CALCIUM STATUS OF TOMATOES

P. Adams
Indeterminate tomato plants were grown in recirculating nutrient solutions until fruit had set on 9 trusses. From anthesis of the first truss, 4 root temperatures (14, 18, 22 and 26°C) were maintained in the nutrient solution, which contained 235 mg l-1 Ca and adequate levels of other essential nutrients.

After 30 days of the treatments, the length and width of the mature leaves and the dry weight and calcium content (% in the dry matter and mg/leaf) of the young leaves had increased at the higher root temperatures. After 72 days, however, the dry weights and calcium contents of the young leaves were highest at 18°C and declined progressively as the root temperature increased.

At 14°C, the fresh and dry weights of the fruit were highest on trusses 1–3 and were generally lowest on trusses 5–7. The calcium content of the fruit from trusses 3, 5 and 7 generally increased over the range 14–22°C but decreased at 26°C.

Adams, P. (1988). SOME EFFECTS OF ROOT TEMPERATURE ON THE GROWTH AND CALCIUM STATUS OF TOMATOES. Acta Hortic. 222, 167-172
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1988.222.19
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1988.222.19

Acta Horticulturae