AN EVALUATION OF CHERRY PRODUCTION IN NEW ZEALAND

R.J. GILLESPIE
Cherries have been grown in New Zealand since the 1920's, but it is only in the past two years that the industry has become large enough to support the establishment of new specialised packing, fumigation and coolstore facilities for fresh exports.

This paper evaluates a number of production and financial aspects of growing both traditionally and intensively spaced cherry trees in the established growing areas. Variable climatic conditions in some locations prior to harvesting have resulted in poor quality crops and low yields. A number of New Zealand cherry growers have recently erected overhead shelters to protect the fruit from rain over the critical period prior to harvest. Covering cherries enables a higher percentage of the fruit to be exported in peak condition at higher prices. The long term cost and benefits of erecting shelters are discussed.

Recent advancements in covering materials, engineering design and the use of growth regulators could make this operation viable on limited areas of a cherry property. Profitability will depend on obtaining sufficient export quality fruit at good export prices.

GILLESPIE, R.J. (1988). AN EVALUATION OF CHERRY PRODUCTION IN NEW ZEALAND. Acta Hortic. 223, 93-100
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1988.223.12
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1988.223.12
223_12
93-100

Acta Horticulturae