EFFECTS OF ATMOSPHERIC HUMIDITY ON GREENHOUSE CROPS

D.W. Hand
Improvements to the insulation of heated greenhouses have led to changes in the microclimate of protected crops. Restricted air exchange results in the atmospheric humidity being much higher inside insulated greenhouses than conventional ones. This increase in humidity may contribute to the loss of output, quality and value that is sometimes observed with salad and ornamental crops grown in energy-saving greenhouses.

The paper draws together information about the influence of atmospheric humidity on all aspects of crop production in greenhouses. Special attention is given to humidities which encourage plant diseases and cause physiological disorders. Occasions when high humidities are desirable (e.g. generating root-pressure to minimize calcium deficiency in fruit or young leaves, using pathogenic fungi to control insect pests, and propagating plants from leafy cuttings) are discussed in relation to energy-saving practices in greenhouses.

Hand, D.W. (1988). EFFECTS OF ATMOSPHERIC HUMIDITY ON GREENHOUSE CROPS. Acta Hortic. 229, 143-158
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1988.229.12
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1988.229.12

Acta Horticulturae