REDUCING CHILLING INJURY WITH MEFLUIDIDE IN CORN (ZFA MA YS L.) PLANTS

Paul H. Li
There are two types of plants in terms of chilling sensitivity. One is chilling insensitive. Plants survive and grow in a chilling environment such as cereals and potatoes. The other is chilling sensitive. Depending on the intensity of chilling, plants may be killed or the foliage damaged, resulting in crop failure or reduced yield. Corn is one of the examples of the latter.

Chilling generally refers to temperatures below 10°C but above 0°C (Levitt, 1980).

Overcoming chilling injury for yield improvement has been a challenge in agricultural research. Numerous attempts have been made: for example, modifying crop practices to avoid injury or breeding and selection for tolerance. Amelioration of chilling injury by application of chemicals has also been reported (Lee et al. 1985; Rikin and Richmond, 1976). The following provides a summary of our mefluidide work in reducing injury of corn seedlings.

Li, Paul H. (1988). REDUCING CHILLING INJURY WITH MEFLUIDIDE IN CORN (ZFA MA YS L.) PLANTS. Acta Hortic. 229, 51-54
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1988.229.5
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1988.229.5

Acta Horticulturae