INTERNATIONAL MARKETING OF HORTICULTURAL PRODUCTS - WHAT PLACE AUSTRALASIA?

C.J. Pope
There has been strong growth in the flow of internationally traded horticultural produce. There has also been a growing sophistication in produce retailing with the powerful chainstores seeking continuity of supply of top quality goods.

Eating quality is the prime concern - visual appeal and price are of lesser importance.

Horticulture in both Australia and New Zealand is at a crossroads.

New Zealand has enjoyed the rewards of an innovative Kiwifruit industry, but this advantage may be lost as competitors increase their production. The success of the New Zealand Apple and Pear Marketing Board has lifted the profile of the pipfruit industry and has also led to many new entrants who question the established marketing structure.

Australia has the opportunity to become a comprehensive supplier of a wide range of products into established markets. Does its horticultural industry have the will and discipline to meet this challenge?

Horticulture is being touted on both sides of the Tasman as one of the answers to the difficult economic times being experienced by our two countries. Horticulture is seen as an emerging sector with new products which can and will counteract the decline of our traditional pastoral products. But is this valid? Is it really as straightforward and simple as many people believe?

When I was invited to address your conference and to nominate a topic within my area of expertise, I decided to try to answer those questions for both Australia and New Zealand.

Pope, C.J. (1989). INTERNATIONAL MARKETING OF HORTICULTURAL PRODUCTS - WHAT PLACE AUSTRALASIA?. Acta Hortic. 240, 283-290
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1989.240.53
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1989.240.53

Acta Horticulturae