PRODUCTION OF HIGHBUSH BLUEBERRY CULTIVARS IN THE MOUNTAINS OF GEORGIA

M.E. Austin, K. Bondari
Five highbush blueberry cultivars (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) were planted in the Georgia mountains at an elevation of 579 m in 1977. Yield and fruit size were obtained for five out of seven years beginning in 1980. Over all the years, cv Jersey had the highest yield followed by cvs Coville, Elliott, and Blueray which did not differ in total yield. Cv. Bluecrop had the lowest yields of all five cultivars. Cvs Blueray and Coville had the largest fruit size, Jersey the smallest, and cvs Bluecrop and Elliott were intermediate in fruit size. Same aged plants of cvs Coville, Jersey, and Blueray in Georgia had higher yields than in Michigan, but for some cultivars the yields were lower in Georgia mountains than were in Arkansas. Relative rankings of the cultivars for both yield and fruit size changed from one year to another indicating a possible genotype X environment interaction. Cvs Bluecrop and Blueray were most sensitive to cold temperatures, cvs Coville and Jersey were intermediate, and cv Elliott was most hardy. These results indicated genetic diversity among cultivars as well as differences in the degree of adaptation to the mountain environment.
Austin, M.E. and Bondari, K. (1989). PRODUCTION OF HIGHBUSH BLUEBERRY CULTIVARS IN THE MOUNTAINS OF GEORGIA. Acta Hortic. 241, 71-76
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1989.241.8
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1989.241.8

Acta Horticulturae