TYPHA: REVIEW OF HISTORICAL USE AND GROWTH AND NUTRITION

A. Liptay
Typha (Typha latifolia) was the most important vegetable used in antiquity by the indigineous North American Indians. Moreover, early European settlers survived on it in times of dire need. It was a prominent diet component because of its widespread occurence, but even more importantly, its availability in an edible form for the greater part of the year. Early in the spring its sprouts could be eaten like asparagus. Later in the season the developing flowers were boiled in water and eaten much like sweet corn on the cob is eaten, especially in North America, today. Still later in the season the pollen was used as an additive with other foods. Throughout the late summer, autumn and winter, the tubers were used as a starch food staple. It was especially during these latter seasons when food was scarce that typha proved invaluable to human survival in the northern climate. Growth and nutritional aspects of typha are presented.
Liptay, A. (1989). TYPHA: REVIEW OF HISTORICAL USE AND GROWTH AND NUTRITION. Acta Hortic. 242, 231-238
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1989.242.31
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1989.242.31

Acta Horticulturae