EXOTIC GLASSHOUSE VEGETABLE CROPS: DUTCH EXPERIENCES

G. Heij
New exotic vegetable crops for glasshouse growing often are not adapted to Dutch climatic conditions. Especially daylength and radiation level differ widely from the conditions in the region of origin.

Moreover, temperature requirements are very high, causing high energy costs in glasshouse cultivation.

Varieties available often are less uniform than world-wide main glasshouse food crops. In order to improve the possibilities of exotic crops much research has to be done by seed companies and research institutes.

On G.C.R.S. Naaldwijk the research of glasshouse crops is directed towards optimizing production and quality in order to increase the commercial possibilities for Dutch growers.

Important growing aspects to be studied in the introduction phase of a new crop are e.g. the optimal choice of varieties, plant density, temperature, planting dates and optimal growing system.

In this paper, exotic vegetable crops are divided into three groups. Firstly crops grown successfully on limited area, such as pakchoi, chinese cabbage, calabrese and yard-long bean.

Secondly: crops which, for various reasons, are not grown on a commercial scale anymore after initial introduction, such as amsoi, sugar maize, watermelon and bitter gourd.

Thirdly: crops which seem promising, but are still in research on G.C.R.S. such as pepino and babaco.

For these three groups of exotic vegetables research and practical experiences with regard to different aspects are discussed.

Heij, G. (1989). EXOTIC GLASSHOUSE VEGETABLE CROPS: DUTCH EXPERIENCES. Acta Hortic. 242, 269-276
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1989.242.35
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1989.242.35

Acta Horticulturae