THE GREENHOUSE IN HORTICULTURE - THE CONTRIBUTION OF BIOLOGICAL RESEARCH

F. Tognoni, G. Serra
Protected cultivation has an increasingly important role in modern horticulture, particularly in regions having a temperate climate. Its economic validity, however, has been compromised by the consequences of the energy crisis, and research has concentrated on this problem, approaching it from the point of view of the construction itself and under the biological aspect.

Studies on constructions and equipment have made much progress, and today rational and efficient structures are available. Just as much research has been dedicated to the biological approach, but here there is still much room for improvement. It is in fact a far more complex aspect, which generally involves adapting the plant to an environment often very different from its own. A global effort to achieve this aim requires the aid of a series of specialists - the geneticist, the physiologist, the horticulturist - all involved in the creation and management of varieties suited to these more or less artificial environments.

Investigations into certain metabolic processes in the plant have contributed decisively in adapting horticulture to the greenhouse, limiting the energy input without compromising productivity. A significant role in this progress can be attributed to modern organizational techniques such as production planning, design and construction of models and informatics applied to both environment and production management. New and more efficient production methods can be found, however, and this task depends on close collaboration among various experts: the engineers who plan the structures and installations, the geneticists who create new varieties, the physiologists who study their functioning, and finally the horticulturists who manage the production process and render it profitable. This meeting offers an excellent opportunity to consolidate this collaboration.

Tognoni, F. and Serra, G. (1989). THE GREENHOUSE IN HORTICULTURE - THE CONTRIBUTION OF BIOLOGICAL RESEARCH. Acta Hortic. 245, 46-52
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1989.245.4
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1989.245.4

Acta Horticulturae