CULTURE AND CULTIVAR SELECTION FOR ANTHURIUM IN HAWAII

R. A. Criley
In Hawaii's 31 million dollar floriculture industry, anthuriums accounted for 26.6% in 1987. Many decades of breeding, developmental research, and cultural advances have contributed to making the anthurium the pre-eminent cut flower in the Islands. This paper reviews cultural programs which have supported the development of this crop.

Anthurium andraeanum Andre was introduced to Hawaii in 1889 and has become its most important cut flower with a wholesale value of 8.3 million dollars in 1987. It is a member of the Araceae and native to the wet western slopes of the Andes in southern Colombia and northern Ecuador at elevations of 400 to 1300 M. Varietal improvment began in Hawaii during the 1940's among hobbyists. A breeding program was initiated by the University of Hawaii in 1950 by H. Kamemoto (1963, 1988). As a result of screening of selections by the early enthusiasts and the breeding program of the University, about a dozen cultivars now form the basis for the commercial cut flower industry (Table 1). The Hawaii Anthurium Industry Association is responsible for the registration of anthurium cultivars (Kamemoto, 1984; Kamemoto et al., 1986). In 1987 there were 190 ha of anthurium in cultivation under natural and artificial shade in Hawaii.

Criley, R. A. (1989). CULTURE AND CULTIVAR SELECTION FOR ANTHURIUM IN HAWAII. Acta Hortic. 246, 227-236
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1989.246.28
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1989.246.28

Acta Horticulturae