PLANT PROTECTION PRACTICES IN COMMERCIAL VEGETABLE PRODUCTION

J. Harden
Cultural practices, including varietal uniformity, sequential planting and monocultures often increase plant protection problems and the consequent reliance on chemical control. Strategic use of agricultural chemicals is, and will continue to be, an integral part of successful vegetable production. However, the use of all methods of pest suppression in a managed plant protection programme is essential for vegetable production.

The proper use of agrochemicals as part of an economically feasible and environmentally acceptable plant protection programme relies on: targeting (pest identification), agrochemical knowledge (activity, formulations), methods of application (hydraulic, CDA, airshear), and integration with biological, host resistance and other methods of control.

Despite current knowledge, losses to pests continue, and even increase, because of lack of attention to the principles of plant protection. Methods must be implemented that minimise pressure on both pests and control methods, particularly agrochemicals. The management of the dynamic pest/crop interactions to minimise losses and maximise returns, is a complex professional activity.

Illustrations of the above principles are provided, along with details of the operation of professional plant protection services.

Harden, J. (1989). PLANT PROTECTION PRACTICES IN COMMERCIAL VEGETABLE PRODUCTION. Acta Hortic. 247, 262-262
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1989.247.49
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1989.247.49

Acta Horticulturae