EFFECTS OF LOW TEMPERATURE DURING SEED DEVELOPMENT ON THE MOTHER PLANT ON BOLTING OF VEGETABLE CROPS

H.-J. Wiebe
Flowering plants of chicory, lettuce and spinach were grown in daylight chambers at 5°C, 10°C and › 15°C during seed development until maturity of seeds. After storage at 2°C germination of each seed lot took place at 5, 10, 15 and 20°C. Transplants were planted outdoors.

Low temperature during seed development on the mother plant increases the number of bolters of chicory and bolting of lettuce. That means, the tendency of a given cultivar to bolt may differ according to temperature in the region the seed production takes place. Bolting of spinach was not influenced by temperature during seed development. All tested crops bolt earlier or with higher percentage after low germination temperature.

Seeds produced at low temperatures and then stored at 2°C for 18 months showed the same after-effects. A heat treatment in a PEG solution (-1500 KPa) at 20°C for 7 days reduced bolting (devernalization).

Wiebe, H.-J. (1989). EFFECTS OF LOW TEMPERATURE DURING SEED DEVELOPMENT ON THE MOTHER PLANT ON BOLTING OF VEGETABLE CROPS. Acta Hortic. 253, 25-30
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1989.253.2
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1989.253.2

Acta Horticulturae