THE ROLE OF OCTANOIC ACID AND DECANOIC ACID IN ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY DURING POLLINATION-INDUCED SENESCENCE OF PETUNIA HYBRIDA FLOWERS

C.S. Whitehead, A.H. Halevy
Pollination-induced senescence of Petunia hybrida flowers involves the transport of at least two signals from the gynoecium to the corolla, one promoting ethylene production (1-aminocyclopropane -1-carboxylic acid, ACC) and the other increasing the sensitivity of the flowers to ethylene. Micro-injection of indoleacetic acid (IAA), amino ethoxyvinylglycine (AVG), abscisic acid (ABA) or ACC into the ovaries of pollinated or unpollinated flowers had no effect on the ethylene sensitivity of the flowers. Application of an exudate from pollinated styles to the stigmas of unpollinated flowers did, however, result in an increase in the sensitivity of the flowers to ethylene. Capillary gas chromatography and GC-MS analysis of the exudate revealed the presence of the short chain fatty acids octanoic acid and decanoic acid in the exudate from pollinated styles. Stylar application of these fatty acids resulted in an acceleration of senescence and an increase in the sensitivity of the corolla to ethylene similar to that observed in pollinated flowers. Our results indicate that following pollination, these acids are produced in the stylar tissues and transported to the corolla where it then causes an increase in the sensitivity of the flowers to ethylene.
Whitehead, C.S. and Halevy, A.H. (1989). THE ROLE OF OCTANOIC ACID AND DECANOIC ACID IN ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY DURING POLLINATION-INDUCED SENESCENCE OF PETUNIA HYBRIDA FLOWERS. Acta Hortic. 261, 151-156
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1989.261.19
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1989.261.19

Acta Horticulturae