EFFECTS OF FLOODING ON ULTRASTRUCTURE AND ETHYLENE PRODUCTION IN CHRYSANTHEMUMS.

E. Gindin, T. Tirosh, S. Mayak
Transient flooding of the root system of chrysanthemum plants (Chrysanthemum morifolium cv. Polaris) led to earlier senescence in the leaves of cut flowers than in those of plants not subjected to flooding. After 24 h of flooding the endogenous ethylene concentrations in the leaves and stem were increased and the petioles developed epinastic curvatures; the concentration of ethylene in the flooded roots was low, but increased when aerobic conditions were restored and reached a peak 11 days after flooding. Flooding also affected the ultrastructure of root cells: the cristae in the mitochondria appeared swollen and the cytoplasm transparent compared with control plants. At the end of a short period of flooding the content of the enzyme superoxide dismutase in the leaves declined, but other proteins were unaffected. Aeration of the roots was followed by a decline in the polypeptides of the photosynthetic system in the leaves. Gibberellin application to the leaves resulted in a change in the composition of polypeptide and slowed down leaf senescence. Two weeks after drainage the plants appeared to recover, but the ultrastructural changes in the mitochondria persisted.

The elevated ethylene concentrations observed in the leaves and shoots of cut flowers from plants previously exposed to flooding stress are discussed in relation to the concomitant changes observed in leaves polypeptide composition and root cell mitochondrial ultrastructure.

Gindin, E., Tirosh, T. and Mayak, S. (1989). EFFECTS OF FLOODING ON ULTRASTRUCTURE AND ETHYLENE PRODUCTION IN CHRYSANTHEMUMS.. Acta Hortic. 261, 171-184
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1989.261.21
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1989.261.21

Acta Horticulturae