COMBINING DISEASE RESISTANCE, PLANT ADAPTATION AND FRUIT QUALITY IN BREEDING SHORT DAY AND DAY-NEUTRAL STRAWBERRIES

G.J. Galletta, A.D. Draper, J.L. Maas
For almost 70 years the United States Department of Agriculture has conducted strawberry breeding research in the vicinity of Beltsville, Maryland, and at a number of cooperating locations. Original emphasis was placed on developing germplasm which had improved fruit characteristics for processing or fresh fruit usage when grown in certain U. S. areas (Galletta et al., 1981). It later became necessary to incorporate resistance to troublesome widespread or serious fungus diseases into the strawberry germplasm. Still later, the Small Fruit Investigations Unit pioneered the testing of clones for virus content and elimination. Early emphasis placed on diverse parent germplasm continues and is partially responsible for the broad adaptability and cultural flexibility of many selections. This review addresses the present aims, methods and results of the USDA Beltsville strawberry improvement program in the last decade. Attention is focused on breeding methodology, especially disease resistance field selection and testing.
Galletta, G.J., Draper, A.D. and Maas, J.L. (1989). COMBINING DISEASE RESISTANCE, PLANT ADAPTATION AND FRUIT QUALITY IN BREEDING SHORT DAY AND DAY-NEUTRAL STRAWBERRIES. Acta Hortic. 265, 43-52
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1989.265.3
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1989.265.3

Acta Horticulturae