EFFECT OF SELECTED VEGETABLE CROPS ON BACTERIAL WILT PATHOGEN POPULATION AND THEIR USE IN CROP ROTATION PROGRAMMES FOR BACTERIAL WILT DISEASE CONTROL

H. Abdullah, K. Sijam
A study was conducted to monitor the population of the virulent mutant of Pseudomonas solanacearum in the soil planted with Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato), Ipomoea aquatica (kangkong), Raphanus sativus (Chinese radish), and Brassica rapa (choy sam) in various rotation programmes over three consecutive plantings. In all cases, the population of the bacteria increased after the planting of tomato and decreased when all other non-host vegetable crops were present. However, a single or double cropping of non-host plants did not reduce the population to undetectable levels, even though the population decreased significantly after each planting of non-host crop. This indicates that more than two plantings of a non-host crop in any combination are necessary to bring the bacteria population to a very low level.
Abdullah, H. and Sijam, K. (1992). EFFECT OF SELECTED VEGETABLE CROPS ON BACTERIAL WILT PATHOGEN POPULATION AND THEIR USE IN CROP ROTATION PROGRAMMES FOR BACTERIAL WILT DISEASE CONTROL. Acta Hortic. 292, 161-168
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1992.292.21
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1992.292.21

Acta Horticulturae