HORTICULTURAL EDUCATION: MEETING THE INDUSTRY'S VISION OF HORTICULTURE IN THE 1990S

I. Hamzah
The primary commodities, after having propped up the Malaysian economy for many years, finally slipped to number two in terms of the country's export earnings. The plantation sector thus has to tap new opportunities; diversification into horticultural activities is a logical exploration. Since most companies are relatively new to this activity, they have to concentrate on research, technology and innovation in order to gain competitive advantage. With labour constraints and good agricultural land becoming scarce because of competition with the industrial sector, horticulture of the future must be knowledge-intensive and not labour-intensive. Because of the unpredictability of the world economy the industries have to adopt a flexible approach in planning. To be in tandem universities must also incorporate flexibility in their curricula. There should also be a narrowing of the gap between university's and industry's values and expectations in terms of research. A practical mechanism needs to be structured for a tangible university-industry relationship in research and training.
Hamzah, I. (1992). HORTICULTURAL EDUCATION: MEETING THE INDUSTRY'S VISION OF HORTICULTURE IN THE 1990S. Acta Hortic. 292, 285-289
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1992.292.37
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1992.292.37

Acta Horticulturae