POSTHARVEST DISEASES AND PROTECTION OF PRODUCTS OF ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE

L.B. Orlikowski
Seeds, bulbs, cuttings, foliage plants, bushes and cut flowers are often the source of pathogens which, in favourable environmental conditions, develop very quickly and cause disease symptoms. Among the pathogenic fungi species of Alternaria, Ascochyta, Botrytis, Colletotrichum, Coniothyrium, Drechslera, Fusarium, Penicillium, Puccinia, Sclerotinia and Sclerotium occurred the most often. The seed-borne pathogens may be transferred from plant to seed, from seed to seed and from seed to plant. On bulbs, cuttings or older plants the pathogens may be transferred within the tissue or on an external plants as mycelium, spores or sclerotia. At present, an integrated control measures might become available methods in production of pathogen-free plants. The following methods are recommended: the use of reproductional materials obtained from pathogen-free meristem tissue cultures, selection and breeding of resistant or partially resistant plants to most dangerous pathogens, production of seed- and bulb-plants on pathogen free area, growth of mother plants under covering in pathogen free substrates on raised benches, treatment of seeds and (or) bulbs in hot water or hot, dry air, soaking of seeds in benomyl, iprodione, prochloraz or thiuram and bulbs in mixture of benomyl with prochloraz, chlorothalonil or imasalil and in near-by future use of antagonistic microorganisms.
Orlikowski, L.B. (1991). POSTHARVEST DISEASES AND PROTECTION OF PRODUCTS OF ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE. Acta Hortic. 298, 359-366
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1991.298.44
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1991.298.44

Acta Horticulturae