ORGANIC FERTILIZATION IN VEGETABLE FARMING - LUXURY OR NECESSITY?

E.O. Beckmann
Prerequisite for the production of optimum vegetable yields of high quality is a soil giving the guarantee for a healthy growth of plants. However, with steadily continuing rationalization in intensive vegetable farming the stress to which a soil is exposed increases (e.g., insufficient crop rotation, increasing use of pesticides and especially herbicides).

Therefore continually the question arises to what degree a soil reacts negatively to those influences, and how far its fertility can, nevertheless, be maintained and possibly be improved. In this connection great importance is attributed to the organic matter in the soil as it controls important physico-chemical and bio-chemical properties. As a result of regular humus supply with additionally sufficient mineral fertilization a positive influence on vegetable crops can always be observed.

The proportion of organic matter by root and harvest residues is smaller with pure vegetable farming than with agricultural crops being interpolated in the rotation. Therefore, the question of humus must find particular attention. Will it be sufficient in this situation if by increased mineral fertilizing, especially by use of nitrogen, the proportion of root residues may be increased as to enable a compensation of humus decomposition? Or is additional manuring, nevertheless, unavoidable?

Beckmann, E.O. (1973). ORGANIC FERTILIZATION IN VEGETABLE FARMING - LUXURY OR NECESSITY?. Acta Hortic. 29, 247-262
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1973.29.16
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1973.29.16

Acta Horticulturae