GENETICAL ENGINEERING AND ITS ROLE IN CONVENTIONAL BREEDING PROGRAMS

G. Scovel, R. Shemi
Bridging the gap between conventional breeding methods and the more direct methods of modern-day genetical engineering involving the extraction, propagation and transferring of genes, begins with a genuine effort to become familiar with both approaches. Carnation growers, advisors, research workers and private breeders will have to learn to speak a common language and to co-operate with one another within the framework of free competition.

Complete integration of genetical engineering techniques with classical breeding programs will then be a feasible expectation.

This review was prepared in an effort to contribute to the process of becoming familiar with various aspects of breeding work on the DNA level. The subject will be tackled gradually starting with meiotic cell division (homologous pairing, crossing over, separation, microspore formation). Afterwards chromosome morphology will be briefly described followed by a general description of DNA structure and gene propagation, transfer and selection. In conclusion, experiments involving DNA fingerprinting in carnation will be mentioned (Vainstein, 1991). The mechanism behind DNA fingerprinting and its potential in the area of variety protection and early stage selection will be discussed.

Scovel, G. and Shemi, R. (1992). GENETICAL ENGINEERING AND ITS ROLE IN CONVENTIONAL BREEDING PROGRAMS. Acta Hortic. 307, 101-108
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1992.307.11
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1992.307.11

Acta Horticulturae