DEVELOPING NEW TROPICAL AND SUB-TROPICAL FRUIT INDUSTRIES THEORY AND PRACTICE

Ray J. Collins
New horticultural industries based on "exotic" fruit crops are emerging in many countries of the tropics and sub-tropics. Some are being led by market opportunities, others are responding to opportunities to produce a fruit where it has never been grown before. Between emergence and reaching their full potential, new industries face many barriers. These include growers regarding each other as competitors, scientists engaging in research independently of each other, and issues of production being the major focus of research.

This raises the question of whether a new industry is more likely to reach its potential if growers, marketers, scientists, and research funding bodies can develop and work towards a common goal. This is the process of whole-industry strategic planning.

The Australian non-astringent persimmon industry has a shared vision of its future. All sectors of the industry helped to develop this vision and translate it into a plan of action.

As a result, government funding has been made available so that research in the areas of production, postharvest, food technology, and marketing can be undertaken concurrently, and co-dependently. Growers are helping to fund this research, and they are being kept informed of its outcomes. In 1991, Australia-wide co-ordinated export trials will be the first test of the benefits of this research approach. If they succeed, the industry can have confidence in its strategic plan. Growers and marketers will be more sure of their continued profitability, scientists will be more sure of continued funding, and government will be more confident of the returns from its investment in research and development.

Collins, Ray J. (1992). DEVELOPING NEW TROPICAL AND SUB-TROPICAL FRUIT INDUSTRIES THEORY AND PRACTICE. Acta Hortic. 321, 825-830
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1992.321.104
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1992.321.104

Acta Horticulturae