USE OF POLARIZED FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY TO MEASURE FLUIDITY OF MITOCHONDRIAL MEMBRANES FROM COLD-TREATED TULIP BULBS

W.A. Kanneworff, L.H.W. van der Plas
Polarized-fluorescence spectroscopy using diphenyl hexatriene as a probe can be used as a method to assess the overall fluidity changes of cell membranes. To demonstrate the use of this method, changes in membrane fluidity of cold-treated tulip bulbs were studied.

Cold treatment of tulip bulbs is common practice. For the production of good quality flowers a cooling period is necessary: for the cv. Apeldoorn a 12-week period at 5°C is optimal. The adaptation of the cell membranes to this cold treatment was studied with membrane preparations from isolated mitochondria. A rapid increase of the membrane fluidity was observed after transfer of the bulbs from 17 to 5°C, although clear phase transitions were not observed during measurement of the fluidity at temperatures between 4 and 30°C. When after cooling bulbs were transferred back to 17°C the membrane fluidity remained at the 5°C level for at least one week. The changes in membrane fluidity were not reflected in a changed fatty-acid composition of the mitochondrial membrane. Apparently, polarized-fluorescence spectroscopy is a rapid method to detect overall changes in membrane fluidity. These changes in fluidity relate to the storage temperature but not to the length of this storage period.

Kanneworff, W.A. and van der Plas, L.H.W. (1992). USE OF POLARIZED FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY TO MEASURE FLUIDITY OF MITOCHONDRIAL MEMBRANES FROM COLD-TREATED TULIP BULBS. Acta Hortic. 325, 277-284
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1992.325.34
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1992.325.34

Acta Horticulturae