LIGHT INTERCEPTION AND YIELD OF PEPPERS GROWN UNDER GLASS IN RELATION TO PLANT SPACING

E.W.M. Verheij, F.L.J.A. Verwer
A photochemical method was used for a series of simultaneous integrating light measurements in a systematic spacing trials, based on a log-log grid of plant positions. The results are compared with those of a similar study with Brussels sprouts grown in the field. There was only a single harvest which was used to determine biological yield, fruit yield, fruit size and colour.

Density, planting pattern and row orientation all influenced light interception by the crop, but only the effect of density was reflected in dry matter yield. The experimental methods apparently overrated the effects of planting pattern on light interception, especially at low density. Glasshouse construction and orientation may have interfered with the effect of row orientation on light interception.

Yield-density relations conformed to the pattern established for other crops. Biological yield remained fairly stable over a wide range of higher densities. The proportion of total dry matter recovered in the fruit, the weight per fruit and the percentage red coloured fruit declined with increasing density. The optimum density for fruit production appeared to be somewhat lower than the minimum density required to attain ceiling biological yield.

Verheij, E.W.M. and Verwer, F.L.J.A. (1973). LIGHT INTERCEPTION AND YIELD OF PEPPERS GROWN UNDER GLASS IN RELATION TO PLANT SPACING. Acta Hortic. 32, 149-160
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1973.32.12
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1973.32.12