PROCESSING OF MEDICINAL PLANT DERIVED PREPARATIONS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES --- PROSPECTS & PERSPECTIVES

R.O.B. Wijesekera
Medicinal plants from developing countries are usually exported in the form of crude drugs. In recent times several developing countries have acquired the capacity for downstream processing of these crude drugs into extracts, partially purified extracts, pure phytochemicals and essential oils. Modern technology and strandards of quality assessment can be used to determine the quality of such products to the mutual benefit of both exporter and importer. Such trade links would be facilitated by common R & D efforts. In addition developing countries process a range of indigenously used medicaments and toilet preparations which are derived from plants and which may serve the markets of industrialised countries. In order that such products may find their way into interested markets there must be developed some commonly accepted norms in both processing and QA/QC methods. The producer countries should strive to utilise scientific methodology as far as feasible and the industrialised countries may be sensitised to the concepts and methodologies that underlie the traditionally developed preparations. Sponsorship of R & D to meet such mutually acceptable norms in developing countries would be of considerable global benefit and could lead to new products for modern use. Some possible examples and methodologies will be discussed.
Wijesekera, R.O.B. (1993). PROCESSING OF MEDICINAL PLANT DERIVED PREPARATIONS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES --- PROSPECTS & PERSPECTIVES. Acta Hortic. 332, 63-72
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1993.332.10
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1993.332.10
Essential oils, Oleoresins, Traditional medicines, Drying, Processing, UNIDO programmess

Acta Horticulturae