ENZYMATIC CHARACTERIZATION OF STRESS INDUCED TRANSLUCENCE OF PINEAPPLE FLESH IN THE IVORY COAST

A. Soler
In Ivory Coast, translucence of pineapple flesh (Ananas comosus var. Smooth Cayenne) is a stress induced phenomenon (mainly water and temperature stresses) but also is associated with genetic characteristics and nutrition. In order to characterize the phenomenon, fifteen enzymatic systems (peroxidative, cell walls or membrane degrading enzymes) were studied using principle component and discriminant factorial analyses (PCA and DFA). Fruits were ripended naturally and sampled at 149, 156 (half translucent), 164 (fully translucent) and 171 (old fruits) "days" after floral induction. Normal ripening and senescence were characterized by an increase in peroxidative and NADH quinone reductase activities. Translucence was characterized by an increase in catalase, and alpha- and beta-galactosidase activities. Two other systems responsible for glutathione and ascorbic acid regeneration had significantly higher activities in the half translucent fruits. The increase in alpha- and beta-galactosidase may be related with translucidity by the modification of membrane galactolipids and permeability changes as in abnormal senescence induced by chilling in tomato fruits. The increase in catalase and glutathione or acid ascorbic regenerating activities may be a reaction of the plant in slowing down the rapid senescence associated with translucidity.
Soler, A. (1993). ENZYMATIC CHARACTERIZATION OF STRESS INDUCED TRANSLUCENCE OF PINEAPPLE FLESH IN THE IVORY COAST. Acta Hortic. 334, 295-304
DOI: 10.17660/ActaHortic.1993.334.30
https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.1993.334.30

Acta Horticulturae